scientiflix:

Angular Momentum

Paul Andersen explains rotating object have angular momentum. The angular momentum of a point object is the product of the distant from the center of rotation and the linear momentum. The angular momentum of an extended object is a product of the rotational inertia and the angular velocity. The change in angular momentum is equal to the product of the net torque and the change in time.

Uploaded by: Bozeman Science.

23 notas

expressions-of-nature:

The Tiger's Nest Taktsang Palphug Monastery (also known as The Tiger's Nest)by: Sami T

expressions-of-nature:

The Tiger's Nest Taktsang Palphug Monastery 
(also known as The Tiger's Nest)
by: Sami T

1 094 notas

chuckhistory:

chuckhistory:

Muhahahaha!!!

Have any friends that are scared of clowns?

chuckhistory:

chuckhistory:

Muhahahaha!!!

Have any friends that are scared of clowns?

81 notas

gamefreaksnz:

Film Review  | Attack on Titan: Collection One 

Attack on Titan Collection One finishes with both a satisfying climax and myriad exciting new narrative threads and dynamics to explore.

by

685 notas

jaidefinichon:

pal Carcamo y el willi se la come

jaidefinichon:

pal Carcamo y el willi se la come

758 notas

zzbbtt:

I love dogs so much

zzbbtt:

I love dogs so much

(Fuente: funny-gif-1)

49 739 notas

kqedscience:

On the Hunt for a Sprite on a Midsummer’s Night
“Every summer evening at 7 o’clock, Thomas Ashcraft receives a personalized weather report. It is monsoon season, and he is getting advice from a meteorologist in Colorado on where to look for the massive thunderstorms that erupt over the western High Plains.
Armed with sensitive cameras and radio telescopes, Mr. Ashcraft hunts for sprites — majestic emanations of light that flash for an instant high above the thunderheads, appearing in the shapes of red glowing jellyfish, carrots, angels, broccoli, or mandrake roots with blue dangly tendrils. (Weather buffs call the tall, skinny ones “diet sprites.”) No two are alike.”
Read more from nytimes.

kqedscience:

On the Hunt for a Sprite on a Midsummer’s Night

Every summer evening at 7 o’clock, Thomas Ashcraft receives a personalized weather report. It is monsoon season, and he is getting advice from a meteorologist in Colorado on where to look for the massive thunderstorms that erupt over the western High Plains.

Armed with sensitive cameras and radio telescopes, Mr. Ashcraft hunts for sprites — majestic emanations of light that flash for an instant high above the thunderheads, appearing in the shapes of red glowing jellyfish, carrots, angels, broccoli, or mandrake roots with blue dangly tendrils. (Weather buffs call the tall, skinny ones “diet sprites.”) No two are alike.”

Read more from nytimes.

102 notas